Category Archive: Uncategorized

Two Years in the Making: the rehabilitation and release of an adult Blanding’s turtle

For years, Adopt-A-Pond has performed mark-recapture surveys for turtles in the Rouge watershed, much of which is now within the Rouge National Urban Park. Despite this effort, an adult Blanding’s turtle who had never been captured before was found in 2019. While exciting,… Continue reading

Ashbridge’s Bay Shoreline Cleanup Project

Written by: Christine Drader, First Nations Conservation Technician On September 1st, our team took part in our final shoreline cleanup event at Ashbridge’s Bay in Toronto. This event was cohosted with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) and… Continue reading

Magnetawan Shoreline Cleanup

 Written by Avalon Carthew, First Nations Conservation Technician  We’re back with another shoreline cleanup blog for our event in Magnetawan First Nation. I’m sure you have noticed a theme in our shoreline cleanup events –… Continue reading

Georgina Island First Nation Shoreline Cleanup Project

Written by Christine Drader   On August 19th, our team took part in the third shoreline cleanup event for our Great Lakes Local Action Fund project. This time around, we headed over to Georgina Island within Lake Simcoe, one of… Continue reading

Bat Weekend Events and Activities #WingedWednesdays

If you haven’t already heard this weekend August 28th and 29th is International Bat Weekend! In celebration the Toronto Zoo’s Native Bat Conservation Program has a bunch of events going on.

International Youth Day – Wetlands and Agriculture

Hi my name is Christine Drader, I am 24 years old and am a First Nations Conservation Technician here at your Toronto Zoo, where I work with the Turtle Island Conservation and Adopt-A-Pond programs. This… Continue reading

Bats of Ontario Part 2: The Resident Species #WingedWednesdays

This week we will focus on introducing the 5 non-migratory species of bats that live in Ontario. These bats spend their summers foraging here in Ontario, where they give birth to and raise their young. They then move on to hibernate over the winter months around Ontario, and emerge as the weather warms in late spring or early summer. Let’s meet our 5 spectacular resident species: the big brown bat, the little brown myotis, the northern myotis, the eastern small-footed myotis and the tri-colored bat.

Head-start Release Day

On June 22nd, 48 of our head-start Blanding’s turtles were released into Rouge National Urban Park by our team members at the Toronto Zoo and Parks Canada. This is part of the effort… Continue reading

Bats of Ontario Part 1: Migratory Species #WingedWednesdays

Over the next two weeks our blog will focus on introducing the 8 native bat species in Ontario. This week we will focus on the 3 migratory species of bats. These 3 bats spend their summers here in Canada, where they give birth to and raise their young. They do not hibernate in caves, but instead fly south, migrating during the fall to spend the winter months in warmer habitats. Let’s meet our 3 incredible migratory species: the Hoary Bat, the Eastern Red Bat and the Silver-haired Bat.

OHSWEKEN SHORELINE CLEANUP PROJECT

Written by Avalon Carthew Believe it or not, we managed to do not one, but TWO, shoreline cleanups last week. In addition to the cleanup in Alderville First Nation on Friday, July 23rd,… Continue reading